News

  • National Carers Week 10 October 2018 Carers are being recognised during National Carers Week from the 14th – 20th October. Carers play a unique and important role in supporting people who are experiencing mental health problems. If you have a loved one who is engaging in treatment at CCI, we would firstly like to say thank you! We appreciate the role you play in supporting your loved one as they engage in treatment. You may find it helpful to read our ‘Information for Carers’ brochure, which provides some information about what you can expect, and how you can support your loved one as they undertake the challenges involved with treatment. Equipping yourself with information can help you provide support to your loved one who is dealing with a mental health problem. The CCI website has free resources that can help you learn more about various mental health problems and helpful coping strategies. CCI also runs free information evenings for family and friends of people with an Eating Disorder, or with...
  • Body Image Awareness Week 10 September 2018 Body Image and Awareness Week ran from the 1st to the 8th September.  It aims to raise awareness of eating disorders, which are a life-threatening illness.  It also takes the opportunity to celebrate our bodies – unique, diverse, strong, and beautiful.  A range of wonderful resources have been developed to assist with these goals.  So what can you do to be part of the conversation? For further information about eating disorders and their treatment, check out the huge range of resources available for consumers and professionals on the CCI website, including our handouts on “Body Image and Body Dissatisfaction” and “Media and Body Image”. As part of Body Image Awareness Week, Dr Bronwyn Raykos from CCI, attended the Inspiration Evening held at the Perth Children’s Hospital.  This was a wonderful opportunity to hear stories from individuals who have a lived experience of an eating disorder share their inspiring stories of reco...
  • Welcome to our new website 08 August 2018 We are very pleased to present our recently upgraded website. Over the years we have been busy developing resources for use in our clinical work when treating people who come to our service for assistance with anxiety, depressive and eating disorders. About 15 years ago we were fortunate to receive a grant which allowed us to develop our original website and make our resources available to consumers and clinicians around the world. Over this time, our website has become incredibly popular and we are pleased that our resources have been so helpful to so many (thanks to everyone who has provided feedback over the years!). The website has also allowed us to promote and provide information about our training program and to highlight our research activities. We have now had the opportunity to upgrade the site, which allows us to reorganise the content and take advantage of many features to make accessing the site easier. All of our resources are still available on this site, and we hope it...
  • Treating severe and enduring anorexia 24 July 2018 CCI has been working with Professor Glenn Waller from the University of Sheffield to assess whether people with more severe or enduring anorexia nervosa have poorer outcomes with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). We also wanted to know whether people who have struggled with anorexia nervosa for longer are less likely to complete CBT treatment. We studied 134 people with anorexia nervosa who completed measures of eating disorder symptoms and quality of life before, during, and after treatment. We found that the duration of illness or severity of anorexia nervosa behaviours, attitudes or weight were not associated with treatment completion or outcomes in CBT. This study shows that individuals with more severe or long-standing anorexia nervosa did just as well in CBT as any other patient starting treatment. These findings offer hope for patients who have struggled with anorexia nervosa illness for a long time they have just as much chance of doing well in CBT as any other individual...
  • Updated handouts for eating disorders 20 July 2018 One of the core areas of CCI’s business is the creation of freely available online resources that are accessible to both consumers and professionals. These include a range of guided self-help modules, as well as many information sheets covering a wide range of topics relating to mental health. These online resources are regularly accessed by people all over the world, and we are fortunate to frequently receive feedback from individuals and organisations that have used our resources (either for research, clinical practice or their own personal use) and have found them to be clear, accurate, and helpful. During 2017, CCI’s Eating Disorders Program team have been hard at work reviewing each and every one of their handouts, with the support of various experts in the field. This has involved carefully revising the content of each handout to ensure they contain the most up to date evidence-based information that is easy and accessible for both professionals and consumers to read...
  • Social anxiety disorder treatment trial 19 July 2018 CCI is currently conducting an NHMRC-funded randomised controlled trial comparing two group treatment protocols for social anxiety disorder (SAD). The trial was funded from 2016-2019 with the aim of providing treatment to around 100 clients with a principal diagnosis of SAD. Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders, with an estimated 8.4% of Australian adults affected at some point in their life. People with SAD are highly fearful of evaluation, often expecting themselves to fall far short of others’ expectations. Situations such as parties, meetings, presentations, job interviews, and just being observed by others can be extremely anxiety-provoking for people with SAD. Because social situations cannot be easily avoided, SAD can be highly distressing, debilitating, and chronic without treatment. To date, over 90 people have been assessed and 60 have been randomised to a treatment condition. After they complete the 12-week group program all cl...